2014 Enhanced Graduated Driver Licensing Legislation Brief

MN Statutes, Section 171.0701, Subdivision 1a Effective the day following final enactment

Each school must establish a schedule or procedure for providing “Supplemental Parental Curriculum” to any primary supervisor who chooses to receive it.

At a minimum, the supplemental parental curriculum must:

  1. Be at least 90 minutes in length;
  2. Be provided by or in the presence of a driver education instructor; and
  3. Provide information concerning graduated driver licensing, safety risks associated with novice drivers, potential influence of adults on driving behavior of novice drivers, and additional resources.

MN Statutes, Section 171.05 (Instruction Permit) Effective January 1, 2015

The applicant may submit certification stating that a primary driving supervisor has completed the supplemental parental curriculum under section 171.0701, subdivision 1a. The certification must be completed by a driver education instructor.

MN Statutes, Section 171.055, Subdivision 1 (Provisional License) Effective January 1, 2015

When a primary driving supervisor has completed the supplemental parental curriculum, the requirements for a provisional license includes submitting a supervised driving log that states that the applicant has driven a motor vehicle accompanied by and under the supervision of a licensed driver at least 21 years of age, for no less than 40 total hours, at least 15 of which were nighttime hours, and identifies dates and lengths of driving time for each supervised driving trip, and is signed by the primary driving supervisor.

When a primary driving supervisor has not completed the supplemental parental curriculum, the requirements for a provisional license includes submitting a supervised driving log that states that the applicant has driven a motor vehicle accompanied by and under the supervision of a licensed driver at least 21 years of age, for no less than 50 total hours, at least 15 of which were nighttime hours, and identifies dates and lengths of driving time for each supervised driving trip, and is signed by the primary driving supervisor.

(Previous law required 30 hours of supervised driving, including a minimum of 10 hours of night driving.)

This legislation adds Minnesota to the list of only four other states that require some form of parent education as part of their novice driver education and/or licensing process. The states include:

  • Massachusetts: (2007)
  • Connecticut: 2 –hrs. (2008)
  • Montana: 1 – 2 hrs. (2012)
  • Virginia:

Other states that have voluntary parent awareness programs include:

  • New Jersey (Share the Keys)
  • Michigan (Checkpoints)
  • Utah (Don’t Drive Stupid)

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Evidence of Success in Massachusetts:

The number of fatal crashes involving drivers under 18 dropped 75% in the three years since Massachusetts implemented the parent class requirement and harsher penalties for junior operators who commit traffic violations.

The number of speeding tickets issued to newly minted teen drivers fell by nearly 60 percent, and the number cited for seat-belt violations, passenger restrictions, and other offenses has fallen at a similar rate.

Reported crashes of all kinds — from minor dings to fatal crashes — among junior operators as well as 18-year-old drivers have diminished steadily as well.

The legislation also doubled the behind-the-wheel component of formal driver’s ed instruction from six to 12 hours; increased the supervised driving time that teens with permits must engage in with parents or guardians before seeking a license from 12 to 40 hours; and added a two-hour parent class to driver’s ed.

Evidence of Success in Connecticut:

New laws, effective August 1, 2008, required longer periods of passenger restrictions for teen drivers, an earlier 11 p.m. curfew time, harsher penalties through increased fines and license suspensions for violators, rigorous training requirements, and a mandated parent-teen information session about safe driving and teen development were implemented. Following the law changes, Connecticut 16 and 17 year-old drivers showed significant reduction in crash rates per population relative to older Connecticut drivers and other 16 and 17 year-olds in the nation.